Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Long-Term Care’ Category

Vietnam Veterans Benefits, Part I

The Vietnam War, also known as the Vietnam Conflict, began in 1954. It was fought between the communist regime of North Vietnam (the People’s Army of Vietnam) and the government of South Vietnam (Army of the Republic of Vietnam). North Vietnam was supported by its allies in South Vietnam (the Viet Cong), along with China and the Soviet Union. South Vietnam was backed by the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Thailand and South Korea. The war ended in 1975 with the capture of Saigon, the capital of South Vietnam, by the North Vietnam army and Viet Cong.

Within the Veterans Administration, veterans who served in the armed forces during the Vietnam Conflict are called “Vietnam-era veterans.” For pension purposes, the VA defines the Vietnam-era as (1) the period from February 28, 1961 to May 7, 1975 in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam during that period, and (2) August 5, 1964 to May 7, 1975 in all other cases. Read more

Please follow and like us:

World War II Veterans Benefits

World War II began in 1939 and lasted until 1945. It was a global war fought on four continents: Europe, Asia, Africa and North America.

The U.S. entered the war following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Approximately 16 million Americans served during the war, with an average duration of service of 33 months. Read more

Please follow and like us:

Home Care for Veterans

Home care is non-medical care provided at home. It is often the first type of care that a senior veteran will need. With home care, aging veterans can remain self-sufficient for as long as possible in a familiar and comfortable environment. It is an alternative to living in care facilities like assisted living or board and care homes. Read more

Please follow and like us:

Long-Term Care for Veterans

According to 2017 estimates, 46% of living U.S. veterans are over the age of 65 (National Center for Veterans Analysis and Statistics). Many of them will end up needing some type of long-term care in their remaining years.

What Is Long-Term Care

People who require long-term care often have chronic health conditions, disabilities or cognitive impairments. The care can be non-medical (custodial) care, medical (skilled) or a combination of both. Read more

Please follow and like us: